Best EDC Knife For 2020 – Reviews And Comparison

Last Updated on by Alex

Premium Choice

Kershaw Cryo Pocket Knife

Kershaw Cryo

Our Choice

SOG-Flash-II-EDC-Knife

SOG Flash II

Budget Choice

Benchmade - 940 EDC

Benchmade 940

Every day carry, or EDC knife is one of the most important tools you can have. Having really well made EDC knives make outdoor chores and tasks a breeze. They are a great and simple way of being prepared for anything life throws at you.

So where’s the catch? With literally thousands of blades available today, you need to know which is the best option for you. Read on to find out my top 10 best EDC knife picks as well as some of the features and functions that make them so perfect.

What Is The Best EDC Knife On The Market Right Now?

Kershaw Cryo EDC Knife 

Kershaw-Cryo-EDC-Knife

1. Stainless 8Cr13MoV Steel
2. Length 6.5″
3. Weight 4.2 oz
4. Drop Point Blade

When this folding knife first hit the market, the negative reviews hitting the web were a huge turn-off. Initially piquing my interest, I thought I would add in my two cents and review why this EDC knife made my best-of list.

A Closer Look

The Cryo measures at 6.5″ long with a blade that takes up 2.75 of those inches. Weighing at 4.2 ounces, this folding knife is perfect for everyday use because of its features. Not originally intended as an EDC knife, this certainly gets the job done and fits the job description well.

This knife features a drop point blade with a fine tip, making it the perfect tool for slicing and dicing. The blade steel is an 8Cr13MoV stainless type, a material that has been made in China. Because of the price of this drop point blade, I didn’t mind so much where it was manufactured. The edge retention isn’t great, having to sharpen it after some basic cutting tasks, but the cold steel holds up well when being sharpened.

More Details

To match the cold steel blade, the handle has also been made from stainless steel. The contrast between the black stainless steel blade and gray here is very pleasing to the eye. Overall the handle construction is a solid effort with all of the corners being rounded off and everything lining up extremely well.

To open and lock this everyday carry knife, Kershaw has provided us with options of thumb studs and a flipper. They have also included their Speedsafe assisted opening technology, which I love and have talked about in many a knife review. The flipper is perfect because it’s easy to reach and is well built. The thumb studs, though? What a flop! They are placed somewhere that is almost impossible to reach, making them very difficult to use.

Locking the drop point blade in place on this knife uses a stainless steel frame lock design. This is reminiscent of Kershaw’s titanium frame lock knives. Overextension of the knife is prevented because of the lock bar stabilizer, and I fell in love with this feature because it’s not commonly used in cheaper, everyday knives.

Final Verdict

On paper, at the start of this review, I thought the Cryo seemed like a decent enough knife, which it quickly proved right because it’s small and functional. The blade steel is of acceptable quality, and the inclusion of a pocket clip means it comes with bonus features worth the money. As a cheap everyday carry knife that is a lower-priced alternative to titanium or anodized aluminum options, I found that it was unique and decently made.

That being said, because of the drop in price when this knife was built, some of the corners were definitely cut. There’s no liner lock, and the blade feels very off-center, the deployment thumb studs are rendered useless, and weighing 4.2 ounces means that the knife is heavy to carry. Kershaw definitely didn’t spend enough time making this into the perfect every day carry blade, and I see it more as a starter knife than a timeless tool you will use for years to come.

Pros
  1. The Cryo measures at 6.5″ long with a blade that takes up 2.75 of those inches and weighing at 4.2 ounces, this folding knife is perfect for everyday use because of its features
  2. Locking the drop point blade in place on this knife uses a stainless steel frame lock design, which is very reminiscent of Kershaw’s very well know titanium frame lock knives
  3. To match the cold steel blade, the handle has also been made from stainless steel and their contrasting gray and black colors are very pleasing to the eye
Cons
  1. There’s no liner lock, and the blade feels very off-center, so using it to do more finer work will be more than hard if we need to be honest
  2.  The deployment thumb studs are rendered useless, and weighing 4.2 ounces means that the knife is heavy to carry, which makes it a decent knife, but a bad EDC knife

2. Spyderco Paramilitary 2

Spyderco-Paramilitary-2

1. Heavy-Duty Folding Knife
2. Sharp Classic Drop Point
3. Cold S30V Steel
4. Great Edge Retention

As a professional knife reviewer, I have compared this pocket knife to hundreds of others I’ve used over the years. From the blade shape to the deployment, this tool had to make it onto the best EDC knife list.

A Closer Look

The Para 2 measures at 8.3″ long with the blade measuring at 3.4″. At 3.75 ounces, it’s relatively lightweight for its slightly larger design. Originally made to be a heavy-duty folding knife or a tactical knife, many people now prefer to use this every day as the best EDC knife in its category.

For blade shape, Spyderco went with the classic drop point, which is common and seen a lot with pocket knives. The edge is extremely sharp, and the features like the ergonomic grip made this knife one I had to review. The blade itself has been constructed from cold steel – the ever-popular S30V that has been used for almost a decade in everyday and survival knives. Because of the material, it’s made from the Para 2 is easy to sharpen and has great edge retention as well. Also, as part of my check, I found that these EDC knives are also resistant to corrosion and rust.

More Details

As one of the best EDC knives on my list, I was happy that the handle of the knife had nested stainless steel liners. The black G10 handle has a reduced weight, meaning that this 3.75-ounces folding knife is quite light to carry. All in all, I love the construction and found it to be built very sturdy and solid.

You can carry the Para 2 in your pocket, making it a perfect choice as an everyday knife. I use it a lot and find that it is so thin and lightweight that I can barely feel it. Deploying the blade is smooth, fast, and consistent thanks to the G10 handle and blade steel features. Even though this knife isn’t made of higher grade titanium, I find it to be one of best deploying folding knives available today.

The liner lock at the back of the folding knife works using compression that puts a liner between the stop pin and the tang. As far as EDC knives go, this is one of the best locking mechanisms there is because it’s incredibly strong and really cleverly made.

Final Verdict

Compared to other EDC knives or even a fixed blade option, this pocket knife packs a punch. It’s a tough knife made from high-quality steel, providing the user with an ergonomic tool that is certainly worth the stellar review and price tag based on its features and capabilities.

Pros
  1. The Para 2 measures at 8.3″ long with the blade measuring at 3.4″. At 3.75 ounces and it’s relatively lightweight for its slightly larger design, making it a good EDC option
  2. For blade shape, Spyderco went with the classic drop point, which is common and seen a lot with pocket knives.
  3. The edge is extremely sharp, and the features like the ergonomic grip make it a very useful tool no matter the situation
  4.  Deploying the blade is smooth, fast, and consistent thanks to the G10 handle and blade steel features, even though it doesn’t use higher-grade materials like titanium

Cons
  1. The thumb grip isn’t finished as well as the other parts of the blade and as a result of every time you reach for it it can cut your knuckles or hand
  2. The tip of the blade is too weak for any prying or non-direct cutting, making it more a kitchen knife than one orientated towards EDC

3. Benchmade 940 EDC Knife 

Benchmade-940-EDC-KnifeBenchmade-940-EDC-Knife

1. Very Lightweight
2. Cold S30V Steel
3. Stylish Aluminum Handles
4. Axis Lock and Thumb Studs

The Benchmade 940 had to appear on the best of list purely because it’s been a staple EDC knife for so long. One of the most popular designs from Benchmade, here we are going to look at what makes this one of the best in our review.

A Closer Look

I review so many knives that they all become a bit of a blur, but this model is definitely from a brand that is close to my heart. The length of the knife is 7.87″ with a 3.4″ blade and weighs only 2.90 ounces, making it one of the better lightweight options that you will love. As a folding knife, it has a lot of versatility and can get a lot of jobs done well.

Instead of a titanium blade, we are looking at the perfect S30V blade steel for this knife’s construction. It’s one of the best carry knife materials you can get for everyday use, and the level of toughness and lightweight features are what makes it so brilliant. Benchmade always does a great job with S30V steel, and this knife is no exception to that.

More Details

The aluminum handles of this knife are striking. As anodized aluminum handles go, the texture is beautiful and isn’t slippery when used. Also included in the handle are stainless steel liners.

The 940 has both an axis lock and thumb studs for deployment. Because of this, the deployment of the knife is both smooth and fast. You can easily access the studs on each side of these EDC knives, and the blade flicks out at quite an alarming speed.

Final Verdict

The 940 has all of the features you would come to expect from one of the best everyday knives. The blade steel is strong, and as a folding knife, everything works well and as it should. The only potential downside that this knife may have is that it doesn’t come cheap but for all the bells and whistles included, this is something that should be expected.

Pros
  1. The length of the knife is 7.87″ with a 3.4″ blade and weighs only 2.90 ounces, making it one of the better lightweight options that you can find with the fact that it doesn’t cut any corners
  2. While this blade doesn’t take advantage of a titanium blade, it uses the very popular S30V stainless steel, that is almost as lightweight, but much more resistant to abrasion and corrosion and even more durable
  3. The 940 has both an axis lock and thumb studs for deployment, because of this, the deployment of the knife is both smooth and fast
  4. The aluminum handles of this knife are striking and as anodized aluminum handles go, the texture is beautiful and isn’t slippery when used

Cons
  1. The blade is very beautiful and comes with many bells and whistles, but that doesn’t justify it’s the high price, with its lack of more premium materials like G10 and Titanium
  2. While the locking mechanism does its job excellently, it is placed and operates in such a way that  during everyday use it will be very uncomfortable

4. Kizer Feist 

Kizer-Feist

1. Very Lightweight
2. Very Compact
3. Contoured Titanium Handle
4. Elegant Opening

Although the first run of Kizer Feist EDC knives had their problems, the production was swiftly put on hold to make this a strong pocket knife. Now in its second production run, this knife sold out at record speed, and the features definitely make it a knife to check out.

A Closer Look

Because the Feist is a pocket knife, it’s on the small side with a 6.55″ overall measurement. This is perfect for one of the best EDC knives because it makes it compact enough for everyday use. The knife only weighs 2.68 ounces as well, making it a pretty lightweight option to carry around with you.

Simplicity is everything with this knife, and the stonewash finish is a beautiful addition to a great piece of a survival kit. The blade is keen and sharp, plus it doesn’t have that wobble that you would come to expect from pocket knives.

More Details

The handle of the Feist is just plain and contoured titanium that makes it luxurious to hold. There’s no scalloping or bumps to deal with, which treats me just fine. The only thing included for vanities sake is a pivot screw, but this is easy to remove if you like your EDC knives looking basic.

The front flipper is one of the main reasons I wanted to review this knife. As EDC knives go, this isn’t a fixed blade with the everyday button releases. Instead, you will find a front flipper with the Kizer Feist. It’s a very elegant choice that may make some ordinary knife carriers check twice to see how the blade actually deploys. But it provides no problems to carry, and it also stops gunk accumulating around the release studs.

Final Verdict

Overall I have been pleasantly surprised and impressed by the Kizer Feist. As far as EDC knives go, the second production of the blade seems to have done away with the shoddy manufacturing of the first run and has fixed any problems very well. The only problem I have encountered with this knife is that the milled clip can be a little bit stiff, but this shouldn’t be a dealbreaker for anyone looking for one of the best EDC knife options out there.

Pros
  1. Because the Feist is a pocket knife, it’s on the small side with a 6.55″ overall measurement, making it perfect for an EDC knife because it makes it compact enough for everyday use
  2. The handle of the Feist is just plain and contoured titanium that makes it luxurious to hold, which is complemented well by a pivoting screw
  3. The knife only weighs 2.68 ounces as well, making it a pretty lightweight option to carry around with you, without removing important features, too

Cons
  1. The only major problem with this knife is  that its clip is a little bit too stiff, but after a couple of weeks it will soften enough that it won’t be that big of a deal

5. Civivi Anthropos 

Civivi-Anthropos

1. High-Value Folding Knife
2. Sharp and Light
3. D2 Tool Steel Blade
4. Milled G10 Carbon Fiber Handle 

The Civivi Anthropos is the sort of EDC you would give to a friend as a gift, even if they don’t carry one with them every day. The attention to detail of this product and the quality of the craftsmanship make it a usable knife that is also pleasing to look at. If you enjoy any other of the Isham designs and appreciate owning a high-value folding knife, then the Anthropos is definitely a solid option for you.

A Closer Look

Elijah Isham is the creator behind the Anthropos, and it is a perfect embodiment of his unique and one-of-a-kind design style. It looks much different from other EDC knives and also has very good ergonomics for a knife that is focused more on style over substance. Not going for the traditional CPM S30V material to make the blade. Instead, this has D2 tool steel and a drop point, which has plenty of girths. The overall blade length measures at 3.25″, making the entire knife just 7.40″ in total length.

More Details

For cutting tasks, I found this knife to be an excellent companion. It’s sharp and light enough to carry with you. The handle doesn’t add many ounces to the weight either, being crafted from a milled G10. Carbon fiber lays over the stainless steel liners of the handle, and it also comes with a pocket clip included that sits deep within your pocket for safety.

Final Verdict

Not knowing much about the Ishram range of knives beforehand, I found the design of this tool to be well thought out and quite well-executed as well. Whilst I wouldn’t call it a go-to carry blade for me personally, it’s a solid enough option to have as a backup or even to give to somebody as a starter knife to get them used to EDC’s and what they can do.

Pros
  1. The attention to detail of this product and the quality of the craftsmanship make it a usable knife that is also pleasing to look at, with its very exquisite details
  2. It looks much different from other EDC knives and also has very good ergonomics for a knife that is focused more on style over substance
  3. Instead, this has D2 tool steel and a drop point, which has plenty of girths and the overall blade length measures at 3.25″, making the entire knife just 7.40″ in total length

Cons
  1. While the blade looks excellently and the overall design is more than outstanding, this EDC knife is less everyday carry than a knife that you will gift to your groomsmen as something they will keep in a box as a memorial gift, the definition of style over substance

6. Steel Will Modus F25-13

Steel-Will-Modus-F25-13

1. Retro Design
2. Thin Blade Stock
3. High Flat Grind
4. Fair Price

Steel Will is a relatively new company on the EDC scene, so I didn’t get my hopes up that this knife would be able to offer me much. I definitely have some quibbles with it, but for the price tag, it’s hard to moan about it.

A Closer Look

The Modus measures in at 7.625″ in length, so it isn’t as long as some of the other EDC knives on this list. The blade fits nicely into the handle, and every part of the knife is utilized for something. There are steel liners included in the knife, but these don’t make much difference to the overall weight. It’s actually quite light to carry, which is something you definitely want to check with an EDC knife.

The blade of the Modus has a thin blade stock with a high flat grind. Both of these could spell trouble for a lot of knives, meaning they can’t cut well and get bound up in any material harder than cardboard. I found the blade to retain its sharpness without having to treat it constantly, but I do tend to wipe it down with cleaner almost every day, even if I haven’t used it, because it stains very badly.

More Details

The way the handle is crafted should have made this knife a stand out star as a carry knife in this list, but I had one massive problem with it – the pattern on the handle. To carry it, it makes indentations in your hand, and the whole experience was quite uncomfortable. As for the mismatched and splotchy flecks of color, it’s a retro design that would do well in the 1990s, but not today.

Despite hating the handle, I found the knife to be unobtrusive to carry in my pocket. The only problem in this area was the flipper latch, which felt like a small bird pecking at my leg intermittently because it should be much smaller.

Final Verdict

This could be a great knife if it were thought out properly. Whilst I know that it is a budget knife, I think the ergonomics could have been better thought out, and the handle design needs a complete revamp. The oversized flipper made carrying the knife an issue, and other competitors in this area could easily outdoor the performance of the Modus.

Pros
  1. The Modus measures in at 7.625″ in length, so it isn’t as long as some of the other EDC knives on this list, the blade fits nicely into the handle, and every part of the knife is utilized for something
  2. The blade of the Modus has a thin blade stock with a high flat grind and both of these could spell trouble for a lot of knives, meaning they can’t cut well and get bound up in any material harder, but they retain their sharpness much longer

Cons
  1. The handle is made to look distinct and retro, but the way the pattern is stamped onto the knife makes it very uncomfortable to hold, making constant indentations in your hand
  2. The flipper switch should be a convenient addition to the blade, but they’ve made it too big and now it’s a constant irritation if you decide to carry the knife in your pocket, which you’ll be doing most of the time
  3. While the knife is made and aimed at more budget orientated people, it cuts too much of the already low set of feature it has for its price

7. Smith & Wesson SWMP4L

Smith-&-Wesson-SWMP4L

1. Stainless 8Cr13MoV Steel
2. Rubber and Aluminum
3. Spring Assisted Opening
4. Made In The USA

The Smith & Wesson brand has long been hailed as one of the best gunmakers in the country. When they first started crafting knives back in 1974, they made sure their heavy focus on safety and security was at the forefront of their designs. The Smith & Wesson SWMP4L was originally designed as a military and police knife and is a popular go-to for a carry knife.

A Closer Look

The blade has been made out of an 8Cr13MoV stainless steel, which is a very popular material coming from China to make EDC knives out of. Even though the steel is quite low cost, the knife is actually very high quality. It’s been heat-treated, so the sharpness is retained for a long period of time. I also found it sports quite good corrosion resistance, too.

With this knife, you get what you pay for. Whilst it’s good at everything, it excels at nothing. It is a steel EDC knife, so it will take on most jobs for you like cutting, but I couldn’t find one task that it was specifically built for.

More Details

The handle is made out of the same sort of budget material as the knife. What sets them apart from your normal cheap EDC knife is that they are stylishly colored and made from a combination of rubber and aluminum. Because of the inclusion of aluminum in the handle, there are some definite drawbacks. It’s very susceptible to being scratched and dinged, as well as being quite slippery to hold despite the textured grip.

As a spring assisted knife, the SWMP4L deploys using a trigger, and the blade whips out at quite a pace. When you close and lock the knife, the spring keeps it in place, so it’s relatively safe to carry in your pocket.

Final Verdict

Despite the incredible name recognition behind this industry giant, the knife seems to be slightly lackluster. Although the blade deployment is fast, and there are several different safety features, the design as a whole feels cheap. The handle is badly made and hard to grip, and even with the inclusion of a pocket clip, this knife just doesn’t want to be carried.

Pros
  1. The blade has been made out of an 8Cr13MoV stainless steel, which is a very popular material coming from China to make EDC knives out of, being as durable as more premium ones while retaining high quality
  2. The handle is made out of the same sort of budget material as the knife, but what sets them apart from your normal cheap EDC knife is that they are stylishly colored and made from a combination of rubber and aluminum
  3. As a spring assisted knife, the SWMP4L deploys using a trigger, and the blade whips out at quite a pace, giving it quick access when you need it in a pinch
Cons
  1. While the knife is a pretty good piece of gear overall, at the end of the day its jack of all trades but master of none, being decent in most tasks, but excelling at not any one of them
  2. Because of the inclusion of aluminum in the handle, there are some definite drawbacks like the fact that it’s very susceptible to being scratched and dinged, as well as being quite slippery to hold despite the textured grip

8. CRKT Pilar 

CRKT-Pilar

1. Thick Scales For Grip
2. Aluminum Backspacer
3. Stellar Deployment Mechanism
4. Stainless 8Cr13MoV Steel

When CRKT first came into the market, I found their knives to be outdated and somewhat stodgy to use. Having got the Pilar, I found that it does have strengths, and there are some applications I could see myself using it for as part of my survival kit.

A Closer Look

The overall length of the Pilar is 6,” and it weighs around 4.2 ounces. I found the best parts of this knife are the way that it looks and not so much the jobs it can perform. For such a heavy knife, there definitely needs to be utilities, but the most common chores will be done with the help of this blade.

Made from 8Cr13MoV steel, it’s not a brilliant choice for any sort of EDC tool, and this one is particularly poor. Even after sharpening it multiple times after using the edge retention is terrible. The steel smudges and discolors, too, if it comes into contact with moisture or oil off the skin.

More Details

There are thick scales for grip featured on the handle of the Pilar, which helps you to use the knife properly. All of the handle steel is held together by an aesthetically pleasing aluminum backspacer. Whilst it’s a very comfortable knife to hold, the ergonomics of the handle with the shape of the blade actually means it’s much more difficult to use the knife. When you hold it, you will think yes, this is the EDC for me, but using it will soon change your mind. The placement of the choil means there isn’t a gap between whatever you are cutting and your finger, making it highly uncomfortable and left me with a need to wash my hands after use.

The blade of the knife actually deploys quite quickly for how poorly the knife has been made, and the thumb oval is placed far enough down the handle for both right and left-handed people to use. As well as the stellar deployment mechanism, the frame lock also works well. There’s no wiggle room or play in any direction once the blade has been locked in which completely cuts out any potential of the blade disengaging from the handle when it’s been closed and carried.

Final Verdict

Even though this isn’t one of the best choices for an EDC knife out there, it’s pretty much the best CRKT has to offer. It’s crying out for the materials to be upgraded even just slightly so you can use it for one job and do it well. But the standard price of the knife is nice, even though it can’t offer the user much.

Pros
  1. There are thick scales for grip featured on the handle of the Pilar, which helps you to use the knife properly. and all of the handle steel is held together by an aesthetically pleasing aluminum backspacer
  2. As well as the stellar deployment mechanism, the frame lock also works well
  3. There’s no wiggle room or play in any direction once the blade has been locked in which completely cuts out any potential of the blade disengaging from the handle when it’s been closed and carried

Cons
  1. For such a heavy knife, it should be able to do more demanding tasks, but at the end of the day it does only jobs that even the cheapest EDC can do
  2. The placement of the choil means there isn’t a gap between whatever you are cutting and your finger, making it highly uncomfortable and left me with a need to wash my hands after use.
  3. Made from 8Cr13MoV steel, it’s not a brilliant choice for any sort of EDC tool, and this one is particularly poor because even after sharpening it multiple times after using the edge retention is terrible

9. SOG Flash II

SOG-Flash-II

1. Fiberglass and Reinforced Nylon Handle
2. Dual Coils and Thumb Ramp 
3. Assisted Opening
4. Top American Brand

The Flash II is a shining example of a knife that has been through the SOG mill and made it out the other side without being ruined. It’s somewhat of a collectible for fans of the brand, coming in multiple edges and handle styles that still make this one of the classics that I would go to for an EDC knife.

A Closer Look 

The Flash II comes in at a length of 8″ and weighs a steady 3.1 ounces. The longer blade and lightweight knife definitely make it an interesting choice as an emergency or tactical knife. If you like a bigger blade on your EDC and don’t want to be weighed down, then this is the perfect option.

The whole knife is very much no frills with a full flat grind and a traditional drop point blade. The satin finish on the lade is something that bothered me as it attracts fingerprints like no tomorrow, and I find myself constantly having to wipe it down. The AUS8 steel the blade has been made from is a great choice for the price point, and I found it useful for a number of different chores around the campsite.

More Details

The boxy designed handle of the Flash II has been made from thicker fiberglass and reinforced nylon that makes it sturdy and nice to grip. The fiberglass keeps the whole item light without feeling like it might fall apart in your hands.

There are no liners on this blade handle, which does have its disadvantages, but for such a chunky design, it’s relatively comfortable to use. I wouldn’t want to do a lot of carving or whittling using this knife, but for cutting up smaller pieces of wood, it works pretty well. The dual coils and thumb ramp on the handle help with grip and lead to more control when doing detailed work.

Final Verdict

Overall I found the Flash II a good knife to use. The assisted open, as well as its lightweight, making it practical and fun to own. There is a downside to the knife with a blade that wriggles around in the handle even when locked, but its still a classic folding option for many people who are fans of this brand.

Pros
  1. It’s somewhat of a collectible for fans of the brand, coming in multiple edges and handle styles that will make this knife a collector’s item
  2. The Flash II comes in at a length of 8″ and weighs a steady 3.1 ounces, thus the longer blade and lightweight knife definitely make it an interesting choice as both an emergency or tactical knife
  3. The whole knife is very much no frills with a full flat grind and a traditional drop point blade and while the satin finish on the late is a fingerprint magnet, it sure does look amazing

Cons
  1. While the blade itself is made pretty good, the actual most important piece of a folding blade, the pivot screw, and the mechanism are abysmal, a common problem amongst SOG models
  2. The already chunky blade is paired with a very flimsy pocket clip that can’t sustain its weight, making it a very poor choice in the face of SOG

10. Off-Grid Black Mamba

Off-Grid-Black-Mamba

1. Lightweight Blade
2. Deep Pocket Clip
3. Bohler M390 Premium Steel
4. Fast Opening Mechanism

As an EDC knife, I love this as an option. Even though it’s not from one of the ‘big boy’ brands in the industry, it provides a really solid choice for EDC and self-defense. Read on to find out why this is definitely one of my go-to’s in this category.

A Closer Look

Weighing only 4 ounces, this is definitely a lightweight blade, and it comes with a deep pocket clip, so it’s easily carried wherever you want to take it. The blade has actually been made from the Bohler M390 premium steel, which is one of my favorites for its strength and great usability. Over the metal of the blade is a powder coating that gives the whole item an incredible resistance to corrosion. The blade retention is also excellent, and the keen edge lasts through multiple uses without having to keep sharpening it constantly.

Now let’s move to the handle, which has been crafted from a grade 5 titanium that also makes up the spacer as well. The open-back design is stunning, too, with a blackwash DLC extending from the frame to make the whole knife feel cohesive and well thought out.

More Details

To engage the blade, there is a flipper lever on the back of the knife. The blade flips out super fast, and it’s smooth as butter because it rolls on ball bearings. The short blade of the knife makes it legal to carry as well, making it a perfect option as an EDC.

I would say that this is one of the most well-balanced blades I’ve come across when it is open. But I wouldn’t say this is a knife that could carry out your everyday tasks. Instead, it’s been aimed for defense purposes, but it’s still a nice blade to have on the shelf.

Final Verdict

If you want a knife that is more suited to tactical tasks, this is the one for you. The carrying capacity is superb, and the balance of the blade makes it perfect for EDC.

Pros
  1. Weighing only 4 ounces, this is definitely a lightweight blade, and it comes with a deep pocket clip, so it’s easily carried wherever you want to take it
  2. The blade has actually been made from the Bohler M390 premium steel, which is one the best blade materials for its strength and great usability
  3. To engage the blade, there is a flipper lever on the back of the knife and the blade flips out super fast, and it’s smooth as butter because it rolls on ball bearings, living up to its name pretty well
Cons
  1. While it’s a very well built piece of gear, that has an amazing ball bearing mechanism, the overall price of the blade is a little bit too high for its other components and materials

FAQs

What Is The Best EDC Knife Brand?

The best EDC brand I would go for above the rest is Spyderco. They always provide stellar blades that have been hand made in the USA. They’re truly dedicated to making brilliant knives, and many of their products are used by the military, law enforcement, and even paramedics.

What Is The Best Steel?

Blade steel is incredibly important to EDC knives, and the material I would choose above the rest is the 1095 carbon steel. This adds 0.95% of carbon to the blade, helping it to keep its edge as well as fighting off rest. With the right storage and the proper care, these knives can last a lifetime, but you want to get a thicker blade made from this steel as thinner ones tend to be brittle and break easily.

What Does EDC Stand For In Knives?

EDC means Everyday Carry, referring to a blade that can be carried with you every day in your pocket or bag.

What Is The Best-Fixed Blade Knife For Every Day Carry?

The best-fixed blade for EDC, in my opinion, would be the Spyderco Ronin. This brand makes solid blades, and the lightweight design makes it easy to carry. It’s also very efficient at cutting and slicing.

Final Words

Choosing the best EDC knife isn’t as easy as it seemed at the beginning now, is it? There are so many different factors like blade shape length, its material and the material for the handle, and all of these need to be combined perfectly to make a usable EDC Knife. Or do they? At the end of the day, I think that besides what the spreadsheet at Amazon says, there isn’t a single best knife, and rather there is one for everyone, based on feel in hand, their relationship to the brand and looks.

The perfect combination is one with good characteristics and the one you personally like, so my advice is to look at all of the knives we have chosen here and get the one that grabs your eye the most. That way you will feel confident about your choice and you will use your knife with real confidence. Well, what are you waiting for? Grab a knife and be prepared for the adventure at any time.

What Is The Best Steel?

Blade steel is incredibly important to EDC knives, and the material I would choose above the rest is the 1095 carbon steel. This adds 0.95% of carbon to the blade, helping it to keep its edge as well as fighting off rest. With the right storage and the proper care, these knives can last a lifetime, but you want to get a thicker blade made from this steel as thinner ones tend to be brittle and break easily.

What Does EDC Stand For In Knives?

EDC means Everyday Carry, referring to a blade that can be carried with you every day in your pocket or bag.